Ongoing Teacher Training on IDEA: Understanding Endrew F. v. Douglas County School District

Research-Based Questions to Guide Best Teaching

Ongoing Teacher Training on IDEA: Understanding Endrew F. v. Douglas County School District

In our post, “How Endrew F. v. Douglas County School District (2017) Changes IEPs: A Look at IDEA for General Education Teachers,” we highlight the work of Michael Couvillon et al., who review the basic requirements of IDEA and explain how the 2017 Supreme Court case Endrew F. v. Douglas County School District changes our understanding of student IEPs. 

The authors argue that it is essential for teachers and administrators to receive ongoing training in special education law because (1) education law evolves over time, and (2) most education-based lawsuits against school districts involve special education services. If teachers and administrators clearly understand the requirements of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) and are up-to-date on changes to special education law, they are more likely to properly fulfill their responsibilities.


Questions to Guide Educators’ Professional Development

  1. How often does your school or school district provide training on IDEA for all general education teachers?
  2. If your district has not provided training on IDEA for all general education teachers, why not?
  3. Do the teachers in your school or school district understand how Endrew F. v. Douglas County School District changes IEPs?
  4. What steps can be taken to ensure that the teachers in your school or school district clearly understand their legal obligations under IDEA?
  5. What measures can be implemented to make sure that the Special Education department at your school or in your school district has clear communication with general education teachers?

Couvillon et al. strongly recommend that professional development for special education law is given by experts, as it is vital that information given is accurate.